Northeast Regional Operational Workshop
Albany, New York
Tuesday, November 2, 2004


Session A. Modeling
 

Utilization of the Stony Brook University Mesoscale Ensemble System at
WFO's and RFC's  (Jeffrey Tongue, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Upton, New York)
 

An Update on the Stony Brook University Ensemble Forecast System (Brian A. Colle
Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary AtmospheresStony Brook University, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY)


Verification of the Stony Brook Ensemble Forecast System ( Matthew Jones, Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres,Stony Brook University, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY)

High-Resolution Simulations of the 25 December 2002 Banded Snowstorm
using Eta, MM5, and WRF (David Novak, NOAA/ NWS Eastern Region Headquarters, Bohemia, New York)
 

Systematic and Random Errors in Operational Forecasts by the UK Met
Office Global Model (Tim Hewson, UK Met Office, Exeter, England)


The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Numerical Prediction for Hurricane
Juan (2003) (Ron McTaggart-Cowan and Lance F. Bosart, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York )
   (Animation Clip)

Customization of a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction System for
Transportation Applications (Anthony P. Praino, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center,Yorktown Heights, NY)

 

Session B. Severe Convection/Warm Season
 

The Long-Lived MCV of 11-13 June 2003 during BAMEX ( Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.,
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)

The Structure and Climatology of Boundary Layer Winds in the Southeast
United States and its Relationship to Nocturnal Tornado Episodes (Alicia C. Wasula, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York

 

A Statistical and Synoptic Climatological Analysis of United States
Heat Waves (Scott C. Runyon, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)


Warm Season Climatology of Convective Evolution Over the Coastal Northeast United States (Michael Charles,
Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York)


The August 9, 2001 Lake Breeze Severe Weather Event Across New York
and Western New England (Thomas A. Wasula, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Albany, New York)


Session C. Operations
 

Getting Ready for Winter: An NCEP Update (Louis W. Uccellini, NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction
Camp Springs, Maryland)


AWIPS Radar and Warning Strategies Using Multiple Workspaces (Josh Korotky, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

Operational Urban Mesonet-Driven Model for Homeland Defense Applications (Mark C. Beaubien, Yankee Environmental Systems, Turners Falls, Massachusetts)


Session D. Hydrology/Tropical Events
 

Frantic About Frances, 9 September 2004 (Richard H. Grumm, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, State College, Pennsylvania)

An Overview of the Tropical Cyclone-Induced Flooding in Central New
York and Northeast Pennsylvania in 2004 (Michael S. Evans, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Binghamton, New York)

 

Wednesday, November 3, 2004


Session D. Hydrology/Tropical Events (continued)

28 August 2004 Flash Flood in Addison County Vermont (Gregory Hanson, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Burlington, Vermont)
 

Warm Season Extreme Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting for the
Burlington, Vermont Region (Paul A. Sisson, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Burlington, Vermont)

The Importance of Real-Time Data During an Operational River Flood
Event (Ron Horwood, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Taunton, Massachusetts)

 

Session E. CSTAR Projects
 

Cool-Season Regime Transition and Its Impact on Precipitation in the Northeast (Heather Archambault, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)

Cyclogenesis and Upper-Level Jet Streaks and their Influence on the
Low-Level Jet ( Keith Wagner, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)

The May 11, 2003 Severe Weather Null Case Across the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States (Michael L. Jurewicz,
NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Binghamton, New York)


Cool Season 500 hPa Cutoff Cyclones; Precipitation Distribution and a Case Study
(Anthony Fracasso, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany,
State University of New York, Albany, New York)


Forecasting Eastern United States Winter Storms: Are We Getting Better and Why ?
(Jeff S. Waldstreicher, NOAA/NWS Eastern Region Headquarters, Bohemia, New York)

 

An Examination of Mesoscale Factors which Influence the Precipitation Distribution of Landfalling Tropical Cyclones
(Alan F. Srock, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences University at Albany, State University of New York
Albany, New York)


Session E. Winter Weather/Cool Season
 

A Simple Physically Based Snowfall Algorithm (Daniel K Cobb Jr., NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Caribou, Maine)
 

The Effects of Climate Variability on Buffalo, New York Winters (Robert Hamilton, NOAA/NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Buffalo, New York )

A Long-Lived Intense Continental-Scale Front: 28 February-4 March 1972 (Lance F. Bosart, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)
 

Session F. Hudson Valley Ambient Meteorology Study

Convective Boundary Layer Structure in the Hudson Valley (Jeffrey M. Freedman, Atmospheric Information Services, Albany, New York)
 

Rain Shadows in the Hudson Valley (Jeffrey M. Freedman, Atmospheric Information Services, Albany, New York)
 

The Hudson Valley Ambient Meteorology Study (“HVAMS”) An Investigation of the Diurnal Evolution of Local Circulations
(Jeffrey M. Freedman, Atmospheric Information Services, Albany, New York)

 

Evening and Nocturnal Winds in the Hudson Valley (David R. Fitzjarrald, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York) (Animation Clip)

 Spatial and Seasonal Changes in Watershed Response to Rainfall Events in the Catskill – Hudson Valley Region
(Matthew J. Czikowsky, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York)

 

NROW 7 will be held November 1-3, 2005